Cilest

Cilest® is a reliable contraceptive and may reduce your risk of cancer of the ovary and womb if used for a long time. The Pill will not protect you against sexually transmitted diseases. This medicine can increase your risk of problems such as blood clots and breast cancer. Some women should not take the Pill because of current medical problems or illnesses.

To prevent pregnancy it is important to take Cilest as instructed and start each pack on time. Please make sure that you understand what to do if you miss a pill or think you are pregnant.

It’s important that you understand the benefits and risks of taking the Pill before you start taking it, or when deciding whether to carry on taking it. Although the Pill is suitable for most healthy women it isn’t suitable for everyone.

Cilest pillTell your doctor if you have any of the illnesses or risk factors mentioned in this leaflet.
Before you start taking the Pill Your doctor will ask about you and your family’s medical problems and check your blood pressure. You may also need other checks, such as a breast examination but only if these are necessary for you or you have any special concerns.
While you’re on the Pill You will need regular check-ups with your doctor or family planning nurse, usually when you need another prescription of the Pill. You should go for regular cervical smear tests. Check your breasts and nipples every month for changes – tell your doctor if you can see or feel anything odd, such as lumps or dimpling of the skin. If you need a blood test tell your doctor that you are taking the Pill, because the Pill can affect the results of some tests. If you’re going to have an operation, make sure your doctor knows about it. You may need to stop taking the Pill about 4–6 weeks before the operation. This is to reduce the risk of a blood clot. Your doctor will tell you when you can start taking the Pill again.
The Pill and blood clots
The Pill may slightly increase your risk of having a blood clot (called a thrombosis), especially in the first year of taking it.
A clot in a leg vein – a deep vein thrombosis (or DVT) – is not always serious. However, if it moves up the veins to the lungs, it can cause chest pain, breathlessness, collapse or even death. This is called a ‘pulmonary embolism’ and is very rare.
Your chances of having a blood clot are only increased slightly by taking the Pill. Of 100,000 women who are not on the Pill and not pregnant, about 5 will have a blood clot in a year. Of 100,000 women taking a Pill such as Cilest, about 20-40 will have a blood clot in a year.

cilest-blister-lOf 100,000 women who are pregnant, around 60 will have a blood clot in a year.
You are more at risk of having a blood clot in your veins: as you get older if you are seriously overweight if you smoke if you or any of your close family have had blood clots if you have any blood clotting problem that needs treatment with a medicine such as warfarin if you’re off your feet for a long time because of major surgery, injury or illness if you have had one or more miscarriages if you have recently had a baby

Tell your doctor if any of these risk factors apply to you. Taking the Pill may add to this risk so Cilest may not be suitable for you.
Signs of a blood clot include: painful swelling in your leg sudden chest pain, difficulty breathing sudden changes in eyesight (such as loss of vision or blurred vision)

See a doctor as soon as possible. Do not take any more Cilest until your doctor says you can. Use another method of contraception, such as condoms, in the meantime.
Very rarely, blood clots can also form in the blood vessels of the heart (causing a heart attack) or the brain (causing a stroke). In healthy young women the chance of having a heart attack or stroke is extremely small.
You are more at risk of having a heart attack or stroke: as you get older if you have high blood pressure if you smoke or drink too much alcohol if you have high levels of fat in your blood or are seriously overweight if you have an irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation), problems with heart valves or heart failure if you or someone in your close family has had a heart attack or stroke at a young age if you have migraines if you have diabetes if you have a blood problem called sickle cell anaemia

Tell your doctor if any of these risk factors apply to you. Taking the Pill may add to this risk so Cilest may not be suitable for you.
Signs of a heart attack or stroke include: sudden crushing pains in your chest which may reach your left arm sudden weakness or numbness in one side or part of your body severe headache or migraine for the first time or worse than normal slurred speech or any other difficulties affecting your speech any sudden changes to your eyesight (such as loss of vision or blurred vision)

See a doctor as soon as possible. Do not take any more Cilest until your doctor says you can. Use another method of contraception, such as condoms, in the meantime.

The Pill and cancer
The Pill reduces your risk of cancer of the ovary and womb if used for a long time. However, it also seems to slightly increase your risk of cancer of the cervix – although this may be due to having sex without a condom, rather than the Pill. All women should have regular smear tests.
If you have breast cancer, or have had it in the past, you should not take the Pill. The Pill slightly increases your risk of breast cancer. This risk goes up the longer you’re on the Pill, but returns to normal within about 10 years of stopping it. Because breast cancer is rare in women under the age of 40, the extra cases of breast cancer in current and recent Pill users are small. For example: Of 10,000 women who have never taken the Pill, about 16 will have breast cancer by the time they are 35 years old. Of 10,000 women who take the Pill for 5 years in their early twenties, about 17–18 will have breast cancer by the time they are 35 years old.
Of 10,000 women who have never taken the Pill, about 100 will have breast cancer by the time they are 45 years old. Of 10,000 women who take the Pill for 5 years in their early thirties, about 111 will have breast cancer by the time they are 45 years old.
Your risk of breast cancer is higher: as you get older if you have a close relative (mother, sister or grandmother) who has had breast cancer if you are seriously overweight

See a doctor as soon as possible if you notice any changes in your breasts, such as dimpling of the skin, changes in the nipple or any lumps you can see or feel.
Taking the Pill has also been linked to liver diseases, such as jaundice and non-cancer liver tumours, but this is rare. Very rarely, the Pill has also been linked with some forms of liver cancer in women who have taken it for a long time.

See a doctor as soon as possible if you get severe pain in your stomach, or yellow skin or eyes (jaundice). You may need to stop taking Cilest.

 Cilest should not be taken by some women

Tell your doctor or family planning nurse if you have any medical problems or illnesses.
Do not take Cilest if any of the following apply to you: If you are breast feeding and your baby is less than 6 weeks old If you have breast or liver cancer

If you have an irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation), problems with heart valves or heart failure If you have ever had a problem with your blood circulation. This includes blood clots, for example in the legs (deep vein thrombosis) or lungs (pulmonary embolism), or a heart attack or stroke If you have any conditions which make you more at risk of a blood clot (thrombosis – see section 2.1), such as having an operation and being off your feet for a long time If you have very high blood pressure If you smoke 15 or more cigarettes a day and you are 35 years old or more If you have migraines which affect your vision If you have had diabetes for more than 20 years or have diabetes with secondary problems If you have or have recently had a severe liver disease If you have the disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with or without Raynaud’s disease If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to any of the ingredients in Cilest.

If you suffer from any of these, or get them for the first time while taking Cilest, contact your doctor as soon as possible. Do not take Cilest as it may put your health at risk.

Cilest can make some illnesses worse
Some of the conditions listed below can be made worse by taking the Pill. Or they may mean it is less suitable for you. You may still be able to take Cilest but you need to take special care and have check-ups more often. Tell your doctor or family planning nurse if any of these apply to you: If you have problems with your heart, circulation or blood clotting, such as high blood pressure If you have diabetes without secondary problems If you have gall bladder problems If you have ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease (inflammation of the gut which causes pain in the abdomen, frequent diarrhoea and tiredness) If you have porphyria If you have a history of migraines If you have brown patches on your face or body (chloasma) as you may need to keep out of the sun If you have (or you have a family history of ) high levels of fat in your blood as you may have a higher risk of pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas, which causes severe pain in the abdomen and back) If you have had any of the following problems while pregnant or during previous Pill use, such as itchy skin or blister-like rash, yellowing of skin or eyes, hearing problem, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), severe headaches, uncontrollable jerky movements, severe diarrhoea with blood in stools (diagnosed as haemolytic uraemic syndrome or HUS)

Tell your doctor or family planning nurse if any of these apply to you. Also tell them if you get any of these for the first time while taking the Pill, or if any get worse or come back, because you may need to stop taking Cilest and use another method of contraception, such as condoms.

Taking Cilest with food and drink

There are no special instructions about food and drink while on Cilest.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Do not start to use Cilest if you are pregnant. If you think you might be pregnant while taking Cilest, do a pregnancy test to confirm that you are before you stop taking it.
If you are breast-feeding, your doctor or family planning nurse may advise you not to take Cilest. Talk to them about alternative contraception. Breast-feeding may not stop you getting pregnant.

Driving and using machines
Cilest has no known effect on the ability to drive or use machines.

Cilest contains lactose
If you have been told by your doctor that you have an intolerance to some sugars, contact your doctor before using Cilest.

What is in Cilest
Each box of Cilest contains three or six strips each containing 21 tablets.
The tablets are round and blue, and engraved ‘C250’.
Each pill contains 250 micrograms norgestimate and 35 micrograms ethinylestradiol.
Cilest also contains the inactive ingredients: lactose (a type of sugar), magnesium stearate and pregelatinised starch, and a dye called FD&C blue No 2 (E132).

How to store Cilest:

Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
Store Cilest below 25°C. Store it in the original package to protect it from light.
Do not use Cilest after the expiry date shown on the strip. The expiry date refers to the last day of that month.
Do not throw away any medicines down a drain or into a bin. Ask your pharmacist what to do with any medicines you do not want. This will help to protect the environment.

What is in Cilest and who makesjanssen_logo_l

The company that holds the Product Licence for Cilest:
Janssen-Cilag Ltd, 50 -100 Holmers Farm Way, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, HP12 4EG, UK
Cilest is made by:
Janssen Pharmaceutica NV, Turnhoutseweg 30, B-2340 Beerse, Belgium
OR McGregor Cory Ltd, Middleton Close, Banbury, Oxfordshire OX 16 4RS, UK

 

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